Newsletters
News & Information for Technology Purchasers NewsFactor Sites:       NewsFactor.com     Enterprise Security Today     CRM Daily     Business Report     Sci-Tech Today  
   
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Click for more information, or
Home Enterprise I.T. Cloud Computing Applications Hardware More Topics...
Personal Tech
Tame your scariest paperwork. Find Out How
Average Rating:
Rate this article:  
California Lawmakers Push for Smartphone Kill Switches
California Lawmakers Push for Smartphone Kill Switches

By Seth Fitzgerald
February 7, 2014 2:22PM

    Bookmark and Share
There is a definite need for a solution to the problem of wireless phone theft. Kill switches for smartphones, as proposed by California lawmakers, are one solution. If we can come up with other ideas and debate them and decide on the best alternative, we should do that. Otherwise kill switches make a lot of sense, said analyst Jeff Kagan.
 



The idea of including a kill switch in smartphones has yet to take off on the federal level but a new bill in California could require phone manufacturers to include kill switches in all phones sold in the state. Lawmakers believe the kill switches will help reduce the market for stolen phones.

Bill 962 proposed by District Attorney George Gascón and Senator Mark Leno has already received the support of several lawmakers in the state. If the bill passes, manufacturers would be forced to include kill switches or face fines of up to $2,500 for every device sold without the feature.

A Growing Problem

Cell phone theft has already become the most common type of property theft in the United States. In fact, according to the Federal Communications Commission, 30 percent to 40 percent of robberies involve cell phones.

In talking about Bill 962, Senator Mark Leno said that phone theft has become such a large issue in the U.S. and in California that sitting around and waiting for something to change is not a good idea.

"With robberies of smartphones reaching an all-time high, California cannot continue to stand by when a solution to the problem is readily available," says Leno. "We are officially stepping in and requiring the cellphone industry to take the necessary steps to curb violent smartphone thefts and protect the safety of the very consumers they rely upon to support their businesses."

Phones are already involved in a large portion of robberies around the US but the problem is significantly worse in California's large cities. According to police statistics, 50 percent of robberies in San Francisco involve mobile devices and in Oakland, that number is even higher at 75 percent.

Good Idea?

We asked Jeff Kagan, an independent technology analyst, for his opinion on the bill and the requirement. He told us that it would be beneficial to have other options on the table and then get people talking about those options. But for right now, kill switches could work.

"There is a definite need for a solution to the problem of . . . wireless phone theft. Kill switches are one solution." says Kagan. "If we can come up with other ideas and debate them and decide on the best alternative we should do that. Otherwise kill switches make a lot of sense."
 

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Katie Mac:

Posted: 2014-02-11 @ 11:30am PT
and cars, debit cards, credit cards, and anything else that someone is going to steal. what took the legistlators so long to recognize that this is a problem?

David:

Posted: 2014-02-10 @ 8:00am PT
I agree if someone stole my cell phone I would like to have it destroy or the data protect from thief right away!

Jeff:

Posted: 2014-02-08 @ 4:04am PT
Kill switches on cell phones are a good idea....making a law not so much. What a waste making more senseless laws.





 Personal Tech
1.   'Right To Be Forgotten': 26 Questions
2.   Civil War Battle Sites Get Mobile App
3.   Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
4.   Internet of Things Comes to DIYers
5.   Review: Amazon's New Fire Phone


advertisement
Product Information and Resources for Technology You Can Use To Boost Your Business

Network Security Spotlight
Researchers Working To Fix Tor Security Exploit
Developers for the Tor privacy browser are scrambling to fix a bug revealed Monday that researchers say could allow hackers, or government surveillance agencies, to track users online.
 
Wall Street Journal Hacked Again
Hacked again. That’s the story at the Wall Street Journal this week as the newspaper reports that the computer systems housing some of its news graphics were breached. Customers not affected -- yet.
 
Dropbox for Business Beefs Up Security
Dropbox is upping its game for business users. The cloud-based storage and sharing company has rolled out new security, search and other features to boost its appeal for businesses.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Watson Gets His First Customer Service Gig
Since appearing on Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer has been making a living using his super-intelligent knowledge base for business verticals. Now, Watson's been hired for his first customer service job.
 
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Microsoft Makes Design Central to Its Future
Over the last four years, Microsoft has doubled the number of designers it employs, putting a priority on fashioning devices that work around people's lives -- and that are attractive and cool.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Tablet Giants Apple and Samsung Feel the Heat
When a company saturates its home market with a once-hot product, expect it to pump up efforts elsewhere. Apple, for its part, is now pushing iPads to big corporations and the enterprise market.
 
Is the Amazon Fire Phone a Winner?
A late entry into a packed category of smartphones, Amazon's Fire phone offers a variety of unique features. Now, the reviewers are assessing if they're enough to make the phone stand out.
 
Review: Amazon Fire Offers New Ways To Use Phones
The Fire phone uses Android, but Amazon has modified it to the point that it's barely recognizable. That means the phone offers new ways to navigate, discover and, of course, shop.
 

Navigation
NewsFactor Network
Home/Top News | Enterprise I.T. | Cloud Computing | Applications | Hardware | Mobile Tech | Big Data | Communications
World Wide Web | Network Security | Data Storage | CRM Systems | Microsoft/Windows | Apple/Mac | Linux/Open Source | Personal Tech
Press Releases
NewsFactor Network Enterprise I.T. Sites
NewsFactor Technology News | Enterprise Security Today | CRM Daily

NewsFactor Business and Innovation Sites
Sci-Tech Today | NewsFactor Business Report

NewsFactor Services
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters

About NewsFactor Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Careers @ NewsFactor | Services for PR Pros | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 NewsFactor Network. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.